How to Know That You’re Driving Next to a Reckless Driverentry-title

You have probably been caught in a situation where you were driving on the freeway or a local road, and someone was driving “recklessly” next to you, in front of you, or behind you. The definition of reckless driving is different for everyone, so it’s difficult to give one solution to this problem. However, if you believe that you are witnessing reckless driving, it’s important that you take some sort of action. This person could be a danger to the public or create a risk to you and others, so it’s always better to be safe than sorry, and to report this to the police.

So, What is the “True” Definition of Reckless Driving?

Any law enforcement official would say that you should report reckless driving, but only if you feel it’s “truly a dangerous situation.” Reckless can be dangerous, as in driving in a way that presents a potential danger to human life. Reckless can also just simply mean careless, as in the reckless driver in question is departing from the care that a reasonable person would exercise in a similar circumstance. Reckless can additionally mean to act with “reckless disregard,” which would mean to proceed to do something while consciously being aware of and ignoring possible consequences. If any of these definitions can apply to the situation you’re witnessing, you should call 911.

What Are Some Examples of Dangerous Reckless Driving?

These are signs of dangerous driving:

  • Weaving or swerving in and out of driving lanes
  • Passing quickly on curves and double yellow lines
  • Driving extremely slowly as to impede other traffic
  • Tailgating
  • Extreme speeding
  • Road rage
  • Disobeying and disregarding traffic signs and road rules
  • Accelerating and braking suddenly

If you were involved in a car accident that was a result of reckless and dangerous driving of another, you deserve to be compensated for your injuries and damages. Contact Steve Gnau today to get experienced representation for your case.

Ways to Avoid a Serious Accident While Travelingentry-title

Spring break is just around the corner, which means many families, friends and couples will be traveling to new and exciting places. Vacation time is usually a relaxing and fun getaway that many people need, and after months of physically and financially planning, you’ll be ready to hit the road. However, with so many people on the highways traveling at the same time, there is bound to be an increase in auto accidents. In any situation, getting into a car accident can be an overwhelming and confusing experience, but this is even more the case when you’re visiting a foreign city or state. Here’s what to do to prepare for this, and how you can protect yourself legally.

Know how your insurance operates in another state/country

 Depending on your auto insurance policy, you can determine your individual rights in a car accident, and most of the time your first-party medical benefits coverage will follow you to another city, state, or country. To know for sure, review your insurance policy before you leave, and ask your insurance agent any questions you have about out-of-state coverage.

Practice safe driving

No matter where you are or where you’re vacationing, you should always drive as safe as possible and follow all driving laws that apply. Avoid a lot of in-car distractions in order to stay alert, ensure that everyone is wearing their seat belts, obey speed limits and construction zone regulations, and don’t drink and drive.

Protect your legal rights

If you are involved in an accident, call 911 immediately in order to seek immediate medical attention. Keep any evidence from the accident scene, and take any photographs of the scene itself, injuries, or damages. Collect all information from the other driver and be careful of anything you say or sign. People will try to take advantage of you if they notice you’re a tourist and are unaware of the system.

Steven Gnau has expertise in representing tourists who were injured in a car accident, or if they were injured in a rental car during their travels. Contact him today if you need to discuss your case.

How to Help a Loved One Who Has Suffered a Catastrophic Head Injuryentry-title

Recovering from an injury can be a tough process for anyone, but traumatic brain injuries are one of the hardest injuries to bounce back from. The recovery process from this type of an injury, also known as a TBI, can last from several months to years, depending on the severity of the injury. If a loved one in your life, like a family member, friend, or spouse, has suffered a TBI or other catastrophic head injury, there are some ways you can help them and keep the process as stress-free as possible.

Stop Asking Them What They Need

Your first instinct is to ask your loved one what they need, constantly, because you want to be there for them and help any way you can. However, this is a frustrating and vulnerable time for the person recovering, so having to answer this question all the time will eventually get old. Over time, try to assess what they need without asking, or just wait for them to ask for help.

Help Out with the Little Things

Sometimes, it’s the little things during this process that will make the most difference in a person’s recovery. Cook your loved one a meal, bring them groceries or basic household supplies, or even offer to tidy up their house. It’s these small gestures that will really end up helping out the most, because it’s the everyday chores and tasks that are the hardest to return to.

Get Them Out of the House

With permission from your loved one, their doctor and/or physical therapist, take them on an adventure. Be mindful of how much they can physically and mentally handle, but depending on their healing process, go for a walk, visit a park, or have a spa day. Sometimes being cooped up in a house all day can make the head injury recovery process more grueling.

Steven Gnau is a strong advocate for any victims of catastrophic vehicle accidents. Head injuries are one of the most common injuries that victims suffer from after an accident, and they are one of the hardest to recover from. Contact Steven Gnau today if you or a loved one has suffered a TBI or other head injury, so you can get compensated for your injury now.

Prepare Your Teen For A Car Crashentry-title

photo of ambulance in street

No matter how much parents in California want to believe that their teen drivers will be safe when on the road unsupervised, accidents happen. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, teen drivers have a three times higher risk of being killed in a crash than drivers 20 years old and older. Per mile they drive, those who are ages 16 and 17 are three times more likely to be in a crash than drivers 18 and 19 years old.

Although a lack of skill may be one of the major contributors to the higher rates of crashes and fatalities, even the most responsible driver could be in a collision. KidsHealth.org points out that knowing what to do in the event of a motor vehicle accident is important for teens. The impact often leaves drivers shaken and unable to think clearly, but parents can help teens overcome these initial overwhelming sensations with some preparation ahead of time.

The first step is to take a moment to breathe and take stock of the health status of everyone in the vehicle. If possible, the vehicle should be moved out of the way of oncoming traffic. A teen’s vehicle should have an emergency kit in it that includes some kind of visibility aid such as flares or warning triangles to alert other drivers to the disabled car. These should be set up immediately following the accident, if possible, whether the vehicle is unable to be moved or it has been pulled over to the shoulder of the road. 

Immediate medical emergencies require a 911 call. If everyone seems to be okay, the teen should notify police, and then get the other driver’s license number, and contact and insurance information. He or she should take pictures and get witness contact information, as well as ask for a copy of the police report. The teen should not apologize for the accident or in any other way admit fault or accept the blame while at the scene of the collision.

Even if a teen is not injured, he or she may still feel emotional, anxious or angry in the days that follow. Parents should watch for these symptoms and others that may indicate that a teen needs to speak to a doctor or therapist about psychological trauma relating to the accident.

Posting About An Accident On Social Mediaentry-title

If you have been hit by a drunk driver or someone who was recklessly operating their vehicle, you may be going through a wide variety of problems. Whether you have physical pain, financial difficulties, or mental trauma, you may feel as if nobody understands the situation you are in or have no idea how to address these challenges. For some victims, social networking platforms are a good way to reach out to others and find some support from family members, friends, and even strangers. However, the sharing of certain types of sensitive information online can lead to problems down the road, so it is important to be mindful when it comes to online posts.

Whether you record yourself and upload a video to the internet or write about certain aspects of the accident in a brief message, this information could potentially be used against you if you are heading to court or decide to file an accident claim with your insurance. As a result, it is pivotal to avoid posting anything that could hurt your case, which could make your life and path to recovery even more difficult. Unfortunately, some people have shared information by accident or without giving too much thought to the content of their message only to have the post create problems when they attempt to pursue benefits they need.

If a negligent driver has turned your life into turmoil, you should do all you can to obtain benefits you need. Visit the auto accidents page on our site for extra motor vehicle crash material.