How Can I Stay Safe During the 100 Deadliest Days of Driving?entry-title

The 100 deadliest days for teenage drivers are the period between Memorial Day and Labor Day. In 2016, more than 1,050 people were killed in motor vehicle accidents involving a teen driver during this period. This is an average of 10 deaths per day and a 14 percent increase compared to the rest of the year.

The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety warns drivers of the dangers during this 100-day period since school is out for the summer and more inexperienced drivers are now on the streets. There are certain safety tips that parents and teens can utilize to avoid deadly accidents this summer.

Safety Tips For the 100 Deadliest Days of Driving For Teenage Drivers?

  • Avoid nighttime driving. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 36 percent of all teenage motor vehicle fatalities in 2016 occurred between 9 pm and 5 am. NHTSA data also shows a 22 percent increase in the average number of nighttime accidents per day involving teen drivers during the 100 deadliest days compared to the rest of the year. Nighttime driving can involve more dangerous factors that result in increased accidents, such as intoxication, sleep deprivation, distractions and poor visibility.
  • Don’t speed. One in ten of all speed-related car accident fatalities involve teen drivers. Speeding is another huge risk that teenagers take. Parents can install devices in their teen’s car to monitor and track their speeds throughout the day.
  • Provide education. As summer takes full swing, it is crucial that parents discuss the dangers of risky driving situations with their teenagers. Education can include teaching by example, creating a parent-teen driving agreement that sets family rules for driving and generally enforcing stricter limits on when your teen can drive and how long he or she can be out at night.

If your teen does become involved in a car accident this summer, then you might want to seek compensation for injuries or damage sustained from the crash. Contact Steve Gnau to schedule a free consultation.